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texas, a democrat appointeded to an immigration reform commission by bill clinton, and the clinton administration briefly flirted with supporting her proposals, which would have reduced illegal immigration and toughened enforcement. in the last decade, the face of restrictionism has been joe arpaio and that, i think, has produced much less favorable political conditions for what essentially in many respects could -- there are some liberal ends to a stronger immigration position. what you're seeing, a tighter labor market at the lower end of the income scale would benefit an american working class that's disproportionately black and lati latino. >> the data has been murky and increasingly less murky that the wage effects of our current immigration regime don't hit, for instance, high school dropouts or low skilled workers like in the labor hierarchy that are native born, as hard as previously thought. there are some dissentures in that, and an economist at harvard is one of them. was there any point of interaction that you're not actually hurting native born workers? i can see a pol
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2 (some duplicates have been removed)